This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate career options.

This course introduces deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity. Topics include theories of crime causation; statistical analysis of criminal behavior; past, present, and future social control initiatives; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and discuss various theories of crime causation and societal response.
This course covers the history/evolution/principles and contemporary applications of criminal law. Topics include sources of substantive law, classification of crimes, parties to crime, elements of crimes, matters of criminal responsibility, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the sources of law and identify, interpret, and apply the appropriate statutes/elements.

This course covers judicial structure/process/procedure from incident to disposition, kinds and degrees of evidence, and the rules governing admissibility of evidence in court. Topics include consideration of state and federal courts, arrest, search and seizure laws, exclusionary and statutory rules of evidence, and other related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss procedures necessary to establish a lawful arrest/search, proper judicial procedures, and the admissibility of evidence.

This course covers ethical considerations and accepted standards applicable to criminal justice organizations and professionals. Topics include ethical systems; social change, values, and norms; cultural diversity; citizen involvement in criminal justice issues; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical considerations to the decision-making process in identifiable criminal justice situations.

This course introduces the components and functions of organization and administration as it applies to the agencies of the criminal justice system. Topics include operations/functions of organizations; recruiting, training, and retention of personnel; funding and budgeting; communications; span of control and discretion; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss the basic components and functions of a criminal justice organization and its administrative operations.
This course introduces the theories and fundamentals of the investigative process. Topics include crime scene/incident processing, information gathering techniques, collection/preservation of evidence, preparation of appropriate reports, court presentations, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, explain, and demonstrate the techniques of the investigative process, report preparation, and courtroom presentation.
This course introduces critical incident intervention and management techniques as they apply to operational criminal justice practitioners. Emphasis is placed on the victim/offender situation as well as job-related high stress, dangerous, or problem-solving citizen contacts. Upon completion, students should be able to provide insightful analysis of emotional, violent, drug-induced, and other critical and/or stressful incidents that require field analysis and/or resolution.

The course covers the impact of the Constitution of the United States and its amendments on the criminal justice system. Topics include the structure of the Constitution and its amendments, court decisions pertinent to contemporary criminal justice issues, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify/discuss the basic structure of the United States Constitution and the rights/procedures as interpreted by the courts.